• Anterior Approach Hip Replacement
    Anterior Approach Hip Replacement

    Anterior Approach Hip Replacement

  • Hip Resurfacing
    Hip Resurfacing

    Hip Resurfacing

  • Revision Hip/knee Replacement
    revision_hip_tabinner

    Revision Hip/knee Replacement

  • Minimally Invasive Knee Replacement
    Minimally Invasive Knee Replacement

    Minimally Invasive Knee Replacement

  • Partial Knee Replacement
    Partial Knee Replacement

    Partial Knee Replacement

  • Knee Arthroscopy
    Knee Arthroscopy

    Knee Arthroscopy

  • Rapid Recovery and Outpatient Joint Replacement
    Rapid Recovery and Outpatient Joint Replacement

    Rapid Recovery and Outpatient Joint Replacement

  • Non-operative Treatment for Hip and Knee Pain
    Non-operative Treatment for Hip and Knee Pain

    Non-operative Treatment for Hip and Knee Pain

Normal Anatomy of the Hip joint

The thigh bone, femur, and the pelvis, acetabulum, join to form the hip joint. The hip joint is a “ball and socket” joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur, or thigh bone, and the “socket” is the cup shaped acetabulum.

The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular surface that allows pain free movement in the joint.

The cartilage cushions the joint and allows the bones to move on each other with smooth movements. This cartilage does not show up on X-ray, therefore you can see a “joint space” between the femoral head and acetabular socket.

Pelvis

The pelvis is a large, flattened, irregularly shaped bone, constricted in the center and expanded above and below. It consists of three parts: the ilium, ischium, and pubis.

The socket, acetabulum, is situated on the outer surface of the bone and joins to the head of the femur to form the hip joint.

Femur

The femur is the longest bone in the skeleton. It joins to the pelvis, acetabulum, to form the hip joint.

Find out more in this web based movie.

Other Procedures

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